Who thought this was a good idea?
Published on May 2, 2007 By greywar In Current Events

     General Casey has decided to issue an edict of very little brain. Ostensibly intended to stop OPSEC leaks (and of course anything negative about the military) from military members who blog or email their families he has decided that you can't write an email to your family or post to your blog unless you let an officer read it first.


"The U.S. Army has ordered soldiers to stop posting to blogs or sending personal e-mail messages, without first clearing the content with a superior officer, Wired News has learned. " -Wired


     Exactly who will this stop? The soldiers who weren't posting OPSEC violations or saying anything negative about the Army in the first place! Disaffected troublemakers who have little to lose will now have their opinions voiced unopposed by the majority. Brilliant! General Casey, you sir, are a tool.

     I look forward to hearing only from soldiers who wanted to run to Canada but couldn't figure out which way was north.

Want to support your troops? Email the PAO office of the Military District of Washington at this email address:

MDWweb@fmmc.army.mil

Don't email angry.

 

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Comments (Page 1)
on May 02, 2007
a) I'm LMAO trying to imagine my husband asking to have his personal emails reviewed before sending them.

This is one of the most ridiculous things I've ever heard.

Technically this applies to me, too. Fuck that.
on May 02, 2007

Fuck that.

 

Well spoken.

 

While we used to censor mail in WWII this aint the 1940's anymore.

on May 02, 2007
Reminds me of the opening chapters of Catch 22, where Yosarian is assigned to censor outgoing mail.

Also has me thinking, "What if soldiers get together and write numerous pleasant but boring emails to all of their relatives, with no OPSEC breaches, and then ask their commander to approve them for delivery?"

Also also has me thinking... they'd rather the soldiers breaching OPSEC on the telephone?
on May 02, 2007

Also also has me thinking... they'd rather the soldiers breaching OPSEC on the telephone?

The real issue is not OPSEC, that is simply a stalking horse for the real problem that officers have with blogs : soldiers telling the truth about officers and policies. They want that stopped and stopped now.

on May 02, 2007
The real issue is not OPSEC, that is simply a stalking horse for the real problem that officers have with blogs : soldiers telling the truth about officers and policies. They want that stopped and stopped now.


Fair. I will say that anything posted "in public" on the internet counts as a "public statement," so soldiers need to be cautious that they don't step over the line from "honest criticism" into "insubordinate behavior" territory.
on May 02, 2007
What I'm thinking is if the Army has so little trust in its Soldiers (the whole bunch) that this is necessary, then there are MUCH bigger problems than blogging snafus.

on May 02, 2007

What I'm thinking is if the Army has so little trust in its Soldiers (the whole bunch) that this is necessary, then there are MUCH bigger problems than blogging snafus.

You would be correct in this assumption and the problems start at the top of the chain of command.

Fair. I will say that anything posted "in public" on the internet counts as a "public statement," so soldiers need to be cautious that they don't step over the line from "honest criticism" into "insubordinate behavior" territory.

 

True enough but that standard doesn't apply to personal emails. Keep in mind that this also covers those. Additionally insubordination is always defined by the officer who has authority over you. It can be anything from anti-government screeds to rolling your eyes in formation. It is always subjective.

 

 

on May 02, 2007

I usually fall on the side of OPSEC.  We just had telephones back in 90/91, and those came with their own set of OPSEC risks.  I know of a few situations where troops gave their 6 digit grid coordinance to their loved ones over the phones (which means they had already sent a map sheet home).

The thing is though, it's a lot easier to control computer traffic than telephone traffic, it doesn't take much to set up a computer so that an OPSEC infraction can be detected easily.  Let the troops know how easy it is and you have taken care of most the problem.

The other thing that should happen is troops know that their emails, IMs, Blogs and other communications are "subject to scrutiny".  That way no one can whine if they get caught in OPSEC violations and officers don't have to be bothered reading them.  I can only think of a few officers that wouldn't be as against this idea as any NCO or troop.

OPSEC is important, it's also violated more than the military would want to admit.  On the other hand, it is still the exception, not the rule.

I agree with you, we have enough blogs about how terrible the war, our troops and the U.S. military is.  I, for one, enjoy reading about what the troops are accomplishing.  We aren't going to here it from the press, and apparently the House and Senate Republicans aren't going to tell the stories either.

 

LET US HEAR FROM THE TROOPS.

 

on May 02, 2007

I, for one, enjoy reading about what the troops are accomplishing.

As do I. I also like hearing how they are living and working from day to day.

on May 02, 2007
Does this also count for Facebook and Myspace comments and messages? I would assume so, just thought I would ask because I like to hear from my cousin, and Facebook works best for us.

And does this mean that messages I send him can be read?
on May 02, 2007

LET US HEAR FROM THE TROOPS.
Reply By: ParaTed2kPosted: Wednesday, May 02, 2007

first off nice to see your ugly face around again even if it is just one comment.

I suggest the entire army get together and start writing two or three innocuous letters daily. Post as many even toned blogs as possible till the generals do what they are there for, to command and fight a war. not snoop the troops.

on May 02, 2007
I suppose this will also end up affecting IM sessions between deployed soldiers and their loved ones back home? If nothing else, I guess I won't be getting phone calls as often since so many others who were using the computers for communication will have to revert to phones. I guess it's a good thing we've already been writing letters anyway. Thanks for the heads up.

Just out of curiosity, who do you think will be clearing the content of Gen Casey's emails for him?
on May 03, 2007

Just out of curiosity, who do you think will be clearing the content of Gen Casey's emails for him?

Of course the rules won't apply to officers whether General or otherwise.

on May 03, 2007
I just saw an article that says it's not as bad as it sounds, it's not intended to be that strict, but...having read the reg, the potential is most definately there


Link

on May 03, 2007
You know, I had assumed this was just for soldiers in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom, but it's not. The new rule is updated under paragraph 2-1g which falls under "All Army personnel."

I may be back after clarification from my supervisor.
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